GROWING THE MAKER MOVEMENT: NEW YORK STATE MAKER SUMMIT

POSTED: 16 Mar 2017 | BY: AMANDA DIROBELLA

New York Makers is thrilled to be attending -- and participating in -- the inaugural New York State Maker Summit hosted by NYSCATE on Friday, March 24, at the Desmond Hotel in Albany, New York. Summit organizers created the event in order to “bring makers, makerspaces, maker events, educators, politicians...and anyone who is passionate about the Maker Movement together to learn about each other, talk about partnerships & the problems that we all run into, and discuss how to grow the movement within the state.” Sign us up!

The Summit kicks off Thursday evening, March 23, with a reception at the Tech Valley Center of Gravity from 6 - 8 PM. On Friday, the schedule is packed with over fifteen panels -- and a collective fifty speakers -- ranging in topics from “How to Run Your Own Maker Events” at 11 AM to “Maker to Market — Securing Funding, Prototyping, Pushing to Market” at 1 PM. The contributors have an interesting variety of backgrounds and are from many locations throughout the state, for example Scott Van Campen, a sculptor and Co-Founder of Staten Island Makerspace and Keynote Speaker Andrew Coy, who worked for the Obama Administration as the Senior Advisor for Making in the Office of Science and and Technology Policy.

Staten Island Makerspace. Photo credit: New York City Economic Development Corporation

New York Maker’s Co-Founder and CEO, Silda Wall Spitzer will be moderating the “Building Communities with Makerspaces, Manufacturers, and Marketplaces” panel at 2 PM on Friday, March 24. Answering Silda’s questions are three of our very own makers -- Cecilia Frittelli, textile artist from Saratoga Springs, Susan Rivers, fiber artist from Saratoga Springs, Tim Jones, sculptor from Pine Plains, and Martin Ping, Executive Director of Hawthorne Valley Farm.

Tim Jones of Stissing Designs. Photo Credit: Judy Sanders

Producer Daniel Schneiderman has been busy curating a roster of speakers, as well as creating informative content for the Summit. Mr. Schneiderman’s passion runs deep for the Maker Movement and its future — believing “with the impact that making has had on so many lives, including my own, it’s hard not to reach out and ask how can I help.” He suggests not to miss the “Makerspace Problems and Solutions” and “Maker Cities” panels at 1 PM and 3 PM, respectively. “[The wider impact of the Maker Movement] has been a huge interest of mine as I’m researching new ways to promote makers, their local impact on communities, and why we should support them” says Mr. Schneiderman — and we heartedly agree with that sentiment and applaud his efforts.

The Summit is sure to attract key, in-state multi-industry professionals for open discussion and offer a wealth of resources for makers. Registration is still open. Click here to attend. We hope to see you in Albany!