BLOODY HANGOVER? BLOODY MARY.

POSTED: 01 Jan 2014 | BY: SOPHIE HAYS

Rumored to have originated at one of New York City's most classic establishments — The 21 Club — the Bloody Mary has long reigned supreme as the brunch cornerstone and hangover cure-all. Here's a look at how New Yorkers are (or, might we suggest, should be) drinking Bloodys at their local watering holes the morning after New Year's Eve. Cheers to a New York state of mind in 2014!

Manhattan’s East Village & Lower East Side neighborhoods feature some of the most exotic and elaborate Bloody Marys in the state. Prune Restaurant has an entire Bloody Mary menu at their always-packed weekend brunch, featuring ingredients like clam juice, wasabi, and pickled Brussels sprouts (not in the same drink, however, unless you really wish it). Meanwhile, Peels offers smoky and spicy variations on the classic hangover cure to pair with exquisite biscuits or shrimp and grits. Inspired by two of our favorite brunch (and dinner) go-tos, here is a New Yorker’s guide to Bloody Mary ingredients. Mix and match as you prefer to create the ultimate New York Bloody.

 

HOME BASE: Not just V8

Vodka (from Clayton Distillery)

A new local establishment in the Thousand Islands-Seaway is proving to be more than the region's first micro-distillery. This small batch stuff is sure to cure your massive hangover any morning, and set you on the right path to a fresh start.

Tequila (inspired by Peels)

Going for a smokier Bloody Mary? Inspired by Peels, mix in your favorite tequila and jalepeños you've got the señorita, Bloody Maria, that make get your travel resolutions going.

Bloody Mary Mix (from McClure's)

No need to make, blend, or juice your own mix ever again. The beautiful balance of the Brooklyn-Detroit pickle entrepreneurs'  spicy pickle brine, tomato paste, and fresh pressed cucumber juice makes the perfect base for your homemade cocktail — and saves time when you're in dire need of a simple hair of the dog.

Horseradish (from ish Premium)

Made and manufactured in the Hudson Valley, all varieties of this family recipe horseradish will add an extra kick to your morning cocktail; think of it as a caffeine alternative. Experiment with flavor varieties like beet, citrus, garlic, or ginger to expand your palette.

 

THE GARNISH(ES): Beyond the Olives

Moroccan Beans (from Brooklyn Brine)

Spice and tart pickle flavors are uncovered in equal measure with the crunch of this Brookyn brand's garnish. Adorn your glass with as many crunchy pickled green beans as it takes to commence your cure; think of it as a twist on gazpacho.

Okra (using Rick's Picks Smokra)

Exotic and spicy is the rare garnish of smokra. This pickled okra, brined and jarred in lower Manhattan, will wow your guests at new year's brunch. Not serving bloody marys or brunch for the inauguration of the new year? These pickled okra (dubbed "smokra" because of the added paprika flavor) pair well with hoppin' john, a traditional black eyed pea and rice dish known to bring good luck in the new year.

Beef Jerky (by King's County Jerky Co.)

Grass-fed and hormone- and antibiotic-free beef is cured in Brooklyn to create some of the most delectable beef jerky available. Inspired by Prune's "Green Lake" Bloody Mary, serve one of King's County's Jerky flavors — cracked pepper, Korean BBQ, or Sichuan ginger flavors — as a "swizzler" accessory to your cocktail.

Hot Sauce (by Queen Majesty Hot Sauce)

Discovered by NYSOM this summer at Brooklyn's Smorgasburg, a weekly outdoor food fare, Queen Majesty's two hot sauce varieties are packed with so much flavor you might consider drinking the bottle by the thimble-full. Hand-crafted in Red Hook are scotch bonnet ginger and jalepeno tequila lime flavors for a little zing to your drink, and some nachos, too, if you feel like indulging.